Tagged: Port of Convenience

Ports of Auckland could be branded first ever port of convenience 0

Ports of Auckland could be branded first ever port of convenience

The ports of Auckland in New Zealand could be declared the first ever port of convenience if management does not put a stop to its savage attack on union rights, according to the International Transport Workers Federation.

Lockwood’s comments show it’s time to sort out short-term labour 0

Lockwood’s comments show it’s time to sort out short-term labour

The Maritime Union says that action must be taken to protect both local jobs and overseas workers in New Zealand industries after recent comments from Opposition immigration spokesperson Lockwood Smith about overseas workers caused an uproar.

Maritime Union General Secretary Trevor Hanson says a progressive downward pressure on wages, conditions and local jobs is spreading throughout large areas of the New Zealand economy, including the horticulture and viticulture sector.

“We are very aware of this problem in the fishing industry and with flag of convenience shipping, and also with attempts to displace waterfront labour.”

Concerns with port takeover threat 0

Concerns with port takeover threat

The Maritime Union of New Zealand has warned against the takeover of New Zealand ports after shipping giant COSCO announced its interest in buying into New Zealand ports this week.

The Chinese state owned multinational corporation COSCO is one of the world’s largest shipping lines.

Maritime Union spokesperson Victor Billot says the Union is opposed to handing control of ports over to global operators.

Free trade deals could mean overseas labour trafficking in ports 0

Free trade deals could mean overseas labour trafficking in ports

The Maritime Union says that free trade deals and recent GATS negotiations have the potential to introduce cutprice overseas labour into New Zealand ports.

Maritime Union General Secretary Trevor Hanson says the use of ship’s crews and imported labour on the waterfront is becoming a major problem around the world.

“International maritime companies are already moving low-wage, short term and casual labour across borders to work in ports around the world.”